Turf Installation Costs

We recently updated our price guide for artificial grass (which you can find here), so we thought it would be a good idea to review our prices for traditional lawn installations.

Call us old fashioned if you wish but we feel that there’s nothing better than an old-fashioned perfect stripy lawn. It’s the cornerstone of a typical English garden.

That, of course, is just our opinion.

On this page, we will cover:

  • the cost to lay a new lawn
  • a breakdown of the costs of each material needed during the installation
  • a works schedule so you can see what steps are involved with this project
  • the various options you have
  • some actionable tips so you can save money
  • where you can source quotes from local, reviewed and rated tradespeople

Are you thinking about laying new turf in your garden so you can have a pristine lawn in time for summer? While some people do this work themselves, others prefer to get a professional in, but how much does that cost and what work is involved?

We are a small group of individuals that have experience in garden maintenance and improvements. We know how much this type of work costs because we budget for it when renovating properties (that’s what we do). Keep reading this page to discover how much it costs to lay turf, we cover everything, from the materials needed, to expected labour costs, we also explain typical profit margins landscape gardeners make.

Reminder: this is just one of many price guides we have on our website.

See our full price list here.
Turf to lawn

Works Schedule

As frequent visitors to our site will know, we like to publish a “works schedule” along with an expected price. These are actual prices we use when estimating projects.

Below you will find a works schedule and price for the removal of an existing lawn and replacement with new turf:

  • Strip out existing lawn and weeds, treat with weedkiller if required.
  • Rotavate soil to a depth of 25cm
  • Dig in extra soil and organic matter as needed
  • Flatten area by foot or with planks
  • Rake in fertiliser
  • Lay turf ensuring joints are staggered
  • Use planks rather than walking on the turf directly
  • Apply top dressing to infill any voids in joints

Materials and Costs For 60 Square Metre Turf Lawn (6m x 10m)

Soil – £225.00 inc vat and delivered

Fertiliser – £50.00 inc vat delivered

Turf – £175.00 inc vat and delivered

Waste Removal (variable as depends on what is in garden) – £150.00 inc vat

Labour 2 workers for 1.5 days – £275.00

Company Profit – £200.00

VAT on Labour and Net Profit – £95.00

Total Cost – £1170.00

Trim Down Turfing Costs by Doing This

The guideline price you see above is for new turf delivered and installed but does make some assumptions that may or may not apply to you:

  • We work in the South East of the UK where prices are higher than the average due to higher labour costs.
  • We assume that the work is done by a medium-sized company that is looking to make a profit on top of the wages they pay their employees. You could make a saving by going with a smaller firm with fewer overheads and lower profit margins. Many “one man” type businesses only charge wages and a small fee to cover fuel or other direct costs.
  • We have factored in VAT on the labour and net profits a company will charge. We are a VAT registered business so we can claim back this tax when we instruct gardeners to work for us. You as a consumer cannot claim this tax back. By choosing a smaller firm that is legally operating below the VAT registration threshold, you can avoid paying this tax (more about VAT savings can be found here).
  • To ensure a proper installation, we have included the cost of extra soil and fertiliser, whether your garden needs this will depend on your garden’s condition. Extra soil is not always required.
  • We assume that the garden is 60 square metres but is easy to work on, i.e. it’s flat and you don’t need any deep or unusual excavation work done. The removal of concrete would, for example, add extra cost in terms of both labour and waste disposal.

When is the Best Time of Year to Lay Turf?

According to the Royal Horticultural Society, the best time of year is mid-Autumn and into winter, as it won’t need too much watering during the late Autumn and Winter months.

While new turf should be protected from harsh frosts and snow, a little cold weather can help make the grass more resilient and hardy.

The worst time is from mid-Spring into summer as the turf will require frequent watering to prevent it from shrinking.

The RHS has an excellent website that you can explore here.

Other Price Guides You Should Explore

Below you’ll find a list of related price guides on our website:

Artificial grass isn’t everyone’s cup of tea but there are many advantages of this low maintenance option that looks great all year round and even in shaded areas.

We recently updated our prices for patios which you can find here.

Everything you need to know about driveways can be found here, including drainage, regulations, planning permission and prices.

Get a Fixed Quote Online

The prices you see on this page are a good estimation of what you can expect to pay but to get a fixed quote, a visit is usually required.

Hit the link below to see how we can help you compare quotes for your garden turfing job:

Get a Quote Online

More:

Assuming the correct watering protocol is followed, the roots should take hold between one and two months after initial laying. It's important that enough water is used to encourage root growth, but not so much that the roots don't drive into the ground seeking moisture.

Weather extremes should be avoided, so don't lay it if the ground will be frozen shortly after or if it's too hot in the middle of summer.

The best times are typically mid-autumn through to mid-spring.

Yes, there are different types of turf, from hard wearing varieties of grass to those that perform well in shaded areas.
Use this link to source quotes for a new turfed lawn.

Below you can find a link to our recently updated trade day rates page:

Day Rates For Tradespeople

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